Sacraments

Eucharist

For Catholics, the Holy Eucharist / Catholic Mass is considered the most important and highest form of prayer. In fact, attending Mass is an obligation, under penalty of mortal sin, each Sunday and on certain other Holy Days of Obligation. 

The Mass is divided into two sections, the Liturgy of the Word and the Liturgy of the Eucharist. The Liturgy of the Word consists of two readings (one from the Old Testament and one from the New Testament), the Responsorial Psalm, the Gospel reading, the homily (or sermon), and general intercessions (also called petitions).

The Liturgy of the Holy Eucharist. During this time, Catholics share in the body and blood of Jesus in the form of the bread and wine passed out to the congregation. 

According to the Bible, this is done in remembrance of Christ (1 Corinthians 11:23-25, cf. Luke 22:18-20 and Matthew 26:26-28). However, according to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, paragraph 1366, "The Eucharist is thus a sacrifice because it re-presents (makes present) the sacrifice of the cross, because it is its memorial and because it applies its fruit."

The Catechism continues in paragraph 1367: The sacrifice of Christ and the sacrifice of the Holy Eucharist are one single sacrifice: "The victim is one and the same: the same now offers through the ministry of priests, who then offered himself on the cross; only the manner of offering is different."

"And since in this divine sacrifice which is celebrated in the Mass, the same Christ who offered himself once in a bloody manner on the altar of the cross is contained and is offered in an unbloody manner. . . this sacrifice is truly propitiatory."

 

 

Baptism

Claimed for Christ - Baptism Program

This program has been prepared by the Archdiocese of Toronto to provide the parents with the information needed to begin the formal and immediate preparation for your child’s Baptism. 

At Baptism, Christ initiates your child into His Mystical Body, the Church. This initiation is completed by the reception of the sacraments of Confirmation and Eucharist.

"In Christ Jesus you are all children of God through faith. As many of you as were baptized into Christ have clothed yourselves with Christ. There is no longer Jew or Greek, there is no longer slave or free, there is no longer male or female; for all of you are one in Christ Jesus."
(Galatians 3:26-28)

We are all brothers and sisters, members of the same family. Baptism is a sign of our membership in the kingdom of God. It calls us to be disciples of Jesus, to follow him. It calls us to use the gifts of faith, hope and love throughout our lives.

Registration:
For your child’s baptism we need notice of a minimum of six weeks. Please email the office to request baptismal availability and registration form. Preference is given to registered members of St. Johns who have been registered at least 6 months to a year.

Baptism Contact

E-mail:  stjohnschurch@bellnet.ca

 

 

Confirmation

also known as Chrismation, is one of the seven sacraments through which we pass in the process of our religious upbringing. According to Catholic doctrine, in this sacrament we receive the Holy Spirit.

The Catechism of the Catholic Church states:

"Recall then that you have received the spiritual seal, the Spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of right judgment and courage, the spirit of knowledge and reverence, the Spirit of holy fear in God's presence. Guard what you have received. God the Father has marked you with his sign; Christ the Lord has confirmed you and has placed his pledge, the Spirit, in your heart."

"Now when the apostles in Jerusalem heard that Samaria had accepted the word of God, they sent them Peter and John, who went down and prayed for them, that they might receive the Holy Spirit, for it had not yet fallen upon any of them; they had only been baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus. Then they laid hands on them and they received the Holy Spirit. Acts of the Apostles 8:14-17."

 

Confirmation Class usually begin in the New Year.  Registration is required by emailing the church early in the New Year.


Marriage

Marriage Policy at St. John’s

Catholic weddings take place in the parish church of the bride or groom. We are happy to meet couples when at least one of the parties is a registered member of the parish and attends Sunday Mass on a regular basis.

 

Booking Dates for Weddings

A couple must contact the office at least one year in advance of the proposed date of marriage. This is a policy of the Archdiocese to ensure adequate time for marriage preparation. In the case of ANY PREVIOUS MARRIAGE, no date may be set unless freedom to marry can be documented.

 

Time for Weddings

Weddings are usually celebrated on Saturdays at 11:30 AM, 1:00 PM or 2:30 PM. Weekday weddings are permitted according to the availability of the church. Sunday weddings are NOT permitted. No weddings are permitted during Holy Week.

 

Marriage Preparation Course

A couple cannot be married in the Archdiocese of Toronto without first attending a Marriage Preparation Course. You may attend an Engaged Encounter Weekend at a retreat centre. Weekend Encounters are held at the Queen of Apostles Renewal Centre in Mississauga at 905-278-5229, or contact Catholic Family Services at 416-921-1163 for locations of other courses. Engaged Encounter Weekends are very popular and must be booked months in advance.

 

Documents Required

a) Every Catholic being married must present a current certificate of Baptism, issued not more than six months before the marriage date. (the certificate cannot be the original certificate).

b) Non-Catholic parties who have been baptized should provide a record of Baptism (a photocopy is permissible for the non-Catholic party).

c) All couples must obtain a marriage license at City Hall and bring it to the office at scheduled 2nd Prenuptial meeting.

 

 

The Presider at the Marriage Ceremony

Usually, the priest who begins preparation with the couple will be the presider at the marriage. However, it may be necessary for another priest to take over after preparation has already begun. Please understand if a change should occur.

Interfaith Marriages

In accordance with Diocesan policy, marriage between a Catholic and non-Catholic or an unbaptized person can be celebrated in the Church. The non-Catholic party is NOT required to become a Catholic in order to be married in the Church.  

 

Readers (Lectors)

Readings from Scripture may be proclaimed by friends or family members chosen by the couple. Readers should be well prepared and attend the wedding rehearsal.

 

Music

Music has an important place in the celebration of marriage. Since a wedding is a worship service, music should be sacred. The couple may meet with the parish organist, Eric Walker, 416-698-4344.  If you are not utilizing our musician please advise the administrator .

 

Altar Servers

Altar servers will be provided by the parish.  

 

Flowers

Make your own arrangements with  your florist. Please notify the administrator the time of delivery. 

Photography

The official photographer and videotographer should speak to the Presider at least 10 minutes before the wedding begins. However please note there is to be no walking around during the vows and at no time should the priests view be blocked.

 

Rehearsals

Rehearsals should be booked when speaking to administrator.  They are conducted the week of the wedding on Thursdays between 4:30 pm and 6 pm. 

 

The address of the church is 794 Kingston Road, Toronto, ON, M4E 1R7.

 

Signing the Register

At St. John’s, the Register is signed near the altar for all to witness.

 

Wedding Coordinators

It is your prerogative to use a wedding coordinator to plan your wedding; however, he or she will have no part in planning or directing the rehearsal or church service.

 

Parking

Parking is available to the north of the church. It is accessed off Kingston Road, through the driveway between the church and St. John School. 

 

Carpets/Runners, Confetti, Candelabra, and Arches

ABSOLUTELY NOTHING like confetti, rice, flower petals, bird seed, bubbles, balloons etc. is allowed to be thrown either inside or outside of the church.  Carpets/rugs, runners are not allowed inside or outside the church.  Candelabra and Arches are also NOT permitted.  Pew bows should be tied with ribbon or cloth, NOT stapled, pinned or taped to the pews and there should be no taping of any signage anywhere in our outside the church.

 

Unity Candles

Unity candles do not have a place in the liturgy. It is suggested that they be reserved for the Wedding Reception.

 

Offerings

The following offerings should be presented to the office, in separate envelopes, clearly addressed:

St. Johns Church......... ……   $450.00 (Members of the Church)

Non Members of the Church $575.00 

Altar Server …………………..$ 20.00      

(Monetary gift for the priest is separate)

The organist and other musicians are paid according to your arrangements with them. The church offering is used entirely for the maintenance and upkeep of St. John’s Church.

 

Please email the office and speak to the Administrator to begin the process

E-mail:  stjohnschurch@bellnet.ca

 

 

Confessions

The Sacrament of Penance
The sacrament of penance is commonly called Confession, and is one of the seven sacraments recognized by the Catholic Church. Catholics believe that all of the sacraments were instituted by Jesus Christ himself. In the case of Confession, that institution occurred on Easter Sunday, when Christ first appeared to the apostles after his Resurrection. Breathing on them, he said:
“Receive the Holy Spirit. For those whose sins you forgive, they are forgiven; for those whose sins you retain, they are retained” (John 20:22-23).

The Marks of the Sacrament
Catholics also believe that the sacraments are an outward sign of an inward grace. In this case, the outward sign is the absolution, or forgiveness of sins, that the priest grants to the penitent (the person confessing his sins); the inward grace is the reconciliation of the penitent to God (which is why the sacrament is also sometimes called the Sacrament of Reconciliation).

The Purpose of Confession
That reconciling of man to God is the purpose of Confession. When we sin, we deprive ourselves of God’s grace. And by doing so, we make it even easier to sin some more. The only way out of this downward cycle is to acknowledge our sins, to repent of them, and to ask God’s forgiveness. Then, in the Sacrament of Confession, grace can be restored to our souls, and we can once again resist sin.

 

Confession in our parish
Every Saturday 3:45-4:15, or can be arranged through the parish office at (416) 698.1105. 

Guide to Confession

 

Common Misunderstandings:
Confession is one of the least understood of the sacraments of the Catholic Church. In reconciling us to God, it is a great source of grace, and Catholics are encouraged to take advantage of it often.

What is Confession?What is its purpose and its effects?What are its requirements?Can we confess our sins directly to God, or must we go through a priest?
Confession Is a Sacrament:
The Sacrament of Penance, commonly called Confession, is one of the seven sacraments recognized by the Catholic Church. Catholics believe that all of the sacraments were instituted by Jesus Christ himself. In the case of Confession, that institution occurred on Easter Sunday, when Christ first appeared to the apostles after his Resurrection. Breathing on them, he said: “Receive the Holy Spirit. For those whose sins you forgive, they are forgiven; for those whose sins you retain, they are retained” (John 20:22-23).

The Marks of the Sacrament:
Catholics also believe that the sacraments are an outward sign of an inward grace. In this case, the outward sign is the absolution, or forgiveness of sins, that the priest grants to the penitent (the person confessing his sins); the inward grace is the reconciliation of the penitent to God (which is why the sacrament is also sometimes called the Sacrament of Reconciliation).

The Purpose of Confession:
That reconciling of man to God is the purpose of Confession. When we sin, we deprive ourselves of God’s grace. And by doing so, we make it even easier to sin some more. The only way out of this downward cycle is to acknowledge our sins, to repent of them, and to ask God’s forgiveness. Then, in the Sacrament of Confession, grace can be restored to our souls, and we can once again resist sin.

What Is Required?:
Three things are required of a penitent in order to receive the sacrament worthily:
He must be contrite—or, in other words, sorry for his sins.He must confess those sins fully, in kind and in number.He must be willing to do penance and make amends for his sins.
How Often Should You Go to Confession?:
While Catholics are only required to go to Confession when they are aware that they have committed a mortal sin, the Church urges the faithful to take advantage of the sacrament often. A good rule of thumb is to go once per month. (The Church strongly recommends that, in preparation for fulfilling our Easter Duty to receive communion, we go to Confession even if we are aware only of venial sin.)

The Church especially urges the faithful to receive the Sacrament of Confession frequently during Lent, to help them in their spiritual preparation for Easter.

Why Is Confession Necessary?:
Non-Catholics, and even many Catholics, often ask whether they can confess their sins directly to God, and whether God can forgive them without going through a priest. On the most basic level, of course, the answer is yes, and Catholics should make frequent acts of contrition, which are prayers in which we tell God that we are sorry for our sins and ask for His forgiveness.

But the question misses the point of the Sacrament of Confession. The sacrament, by its very nature, confers graces that help us to live a Christian life, which is why the Church requires us to receive it at least once per year. Moreover, it was instituted by Christ as the proper form for the forgiveness of our sins. Therefore, we should not only be willing to receive the sacrament, but we should embrace it as a gift from a loving God.

By Scott P. Richert, 
from: http://catholicism.about.com/od/beliefsteachings/p/Why_Confession.htm

   

Anointing of the Sick

The anointing of the sick is administered to bring spiritual and even physical strength during an illness, especially near the time of death. It is most likely one of the last sacraments one will receive. 

A sacrament is an outward sign established by Jesus Christ to confer inward grace. In more basic terms, it is a rite that is performed to convey God’s grace to the recipient, through the power of the Holy Spirit. 


Like all the sacraments, holy anointing was instituted by Jesus Christ during his earthly ministry. 

The Catechism explains:
"This sacred anointing of the sick was instituted by Christ our Lord as a true and proper sacrament of the New Testament. It is alluded to indeed by Mark, but is recommended to the faithful and promulgated by James the apostle and brother of the Lord" (CCC 1511; Mark 6:13; Jas. 5:14-15).


"The special grace of the sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick has as its effects: the uniting of the sick person to the passion of Christ, for his own good and that of the whole Church; the strengthening, peace, and courage to endure in a Christian manner the sufferings of illness or old age; the forgiveness of sins, if the sick person was not able to obtain it through the sacrament of penance; the restoration of health, if it is conducive to the salvation of his soul; the preparation for passing over to eternal life" (CCC 1532). 

Does a person have to be dying to receive this sacrament? No. 

The Catechism says:
"The anointing of the sick is not a sacrament for those only who are at the point of death. Hence, as soon as anyone of the faithful begins to be in danger of death from sickness or old age, the fitting time for him to receive this sacrament has certainly already arrived" (CCC 1514).

 

 

 

Parish of Saint John 794 Kingston Road,Toronto, Ontario M4E 1R7 Tel: 416.698.1105 stjohnschurch@bellnet.ca  © 2014 

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